FAQ

  • What is being asked of voters?
    • The college is asking voters in its taxing district to pass a bond measure that will fund construction of a new technical education facility and renovation of existing technical education facilities.
  • Who gets to vote?
    • Registered voters who live in the college’s taxing district, which is comprised of Benton and Pettis counties, the Cooper County R-VI Otterville school district and portions of Henry, Morgan, Johnson and Saline counties.
  • What is the voter approval requirement?
    • An overall four-sevenths (57.14%) majority.
  • What’s the difference between a bond measure and a tax levy?
    • By law, bond measures only provide funds for new construction, renovation of existing facilities, and the purchase of capital technology and equipment. Tax levy funds are used to pay for operating costs such as salaries, benefits, utilities, materials, and supplies. SFCC is proposing a bond measure.
  • What is the amount of the proposed bond measure?
    • The total cost of the bond is $28 million.
  • How long will SFCC pay on the bond?
    • The bond will sunset – meaning the payments will end – after 20 years.
  • Are there property tax credits for the elderly or disabled?
    • Yes. The Missouri Property Tax Credit Claim gives credit to certain senior citizens and 100 percent disabled individuals for a portion of the real estate taxes or rent they have paid for the year. To learn more, visit http://dor.mo.gov/personal/ptc/.
  • Why does SFCC need to pass a bond measure?
    • The bond allows the college to expand technical education programs and to do that, a new technical education facility is needed. The expansion is necessary to keep up with student demand for technical programs and business and industry’s demand for a more skilled workforce, which meets the needs of our region’s economy.
  • What will the money be spent on?
    • Most of the bond funds will be allocated to construct, furnish and equip a new technical education facility. The rest will pay to renovate the existing Fielding Technical Center to allow for expansion of the State Fair Career and Technology Center (CTC) programs that will remain in that building. The Fielding Technical Center was built in 1978 and lacks adequate space and state-of-the-art equipment to expand current programs.
  • How many more students will SFCC be able to serve with this additional space?
    • The potential enrollment increase is about 275 students by expanding current programs and adding new programs.
  • Where will the new technical education facility be located?
    • Southwest part of the Sedalia campus near the Potter-Ewing Agriculture Building.
  • When would construction begin and when would it be completed?
    • Construction could begin in fall 2017 with the target for completion in late 2018 or early 2019.
  • How big is the building and what will it look like?
    • The estimated size of the building is 116,000-square-feet. Its layout is a partial two-story with much of the second floor unfinished that allows for future growth. The current design includes:
      • 25 classrooms, 14 labs and 13 overhead doors
      • A student resource center for studying and collaboration
      • A makerspace fabrication lab
      • Drive-in classrooms for the Automotive program
      • Two multi-function lecture/lab classrooms for Industrial Maintenance
      • Separate labs for welding fabrication, grinding and plasma cutting
      • Lab space for advanced manufacturing and robotics classes
      • Expandable meeting/conference room
      • Glass walls for viewing the precision machining and advanced manufacturing lab
      • Classroom for the LearningForce’s Commercial Driving Academy
  • How will this additional space impact current workers?
    • A study by the Missouri Chamber of Commerce found there is a “skills gap” between what business and industry need and the skills employees have, and there’s a strong interest to upskill the current workforce. The demand for training current workers in welding, machining, industrial maintenance and other technical skills has grown and many businesses already turn to SFCC for that training. The college’s LearningForce works with regional business and industry to provide relevant and customized training that fits their employment needs. Our instructors deliver training on location at companies from Marshall to Camdenton. By moving to the new technical education facility, The LearningForce will have more on-campus space to provide training as the demand grows.
  • What is SFCC’s current tax levy rate?
    • The college’s current tax levy rate is 40.8 cents.
  • When was the last time SFCC passed a bond measure or tax levy increase?
    • In 1985, voters approved a 15-cent tax levy increase, but it was immediately rolled back because of the Hancock Amendment. No bond measure presented has ever passed, and the college’s tax levy rate is virtually the same as when the college district was formed in 1966.
  • Will any of SFCC’s operational budget or reserve funds be used to construct the building?
    • No. The college operates on a lean budget. Revenue sources include local taxes, state funding and student tuition. The college’s tax levy rate is very low compared to other local tax levy rates, state funding for higher education has been reduced and is unpredictable, and tuition is kept affordable in order to ensure student access. There is not sufficient funds in the operational budget to fund construction of a new building. By board policy, the college is required to have between 10 and 25 percent of its operational budget in a reserve fund balance. The current reserve fund balance isn’t sufficient enough to fund construction of a new building. The college conducted voter research to determine support for its mission and facility initiatives. Building a new technical education facility was the most popular initiative with 95 percent of participants calling it either a “high priority” or “medium priority.” About 62 percent of survey participants indicated they would “strongly favor” or “favor” a tax increase that would fund one or two initiatives. For these reasons, SFCC’s Board of Trustees voted to place a bond measure on the ballot and ask for voter approval to fund construction of a new building.